Genesis


In 1985 the introduction of an inexpensive laser printer (it sold for less than $5,000) and a software program from Aldus corporation called Pagemaker (cost about $1,000) triggered the creation of what today we call Desktop Publishing. Prior to the introduction of those two items, it was common to spend over $100,000 for computer hardware, software, image setters, and to hire a 'typesetter' or two and set up in business. By 1986 there were no more typesetters. Most of them had gone into business for themselves by buying a Macintosh computer, (Pagemaker only ran on Macintosh computers at the time) a laser printer and Pagemaker. Desktop Publishing allowed us to easily combine text and graphics on the same page, and anyone could do it!

The only advantage that typesetters had over a novice who bought the same equipment, was they knew what they were doing and how to do it quickly. The rest of us were on our own and what was produced by all those novices was thrilling, and at the same time rather chaotic. It took a few years for the novices to learn the rules that the typesetters knew well. Ironically the typesetters were in the best position to educate the rest of us, but by and large, they did not take up the gauntlet. The traditional way to learn the trade was to apprentice with an established typesetter and learn over time.

This is not an uncommon situation. When paradigms change it is the established people who have the first opportunity to take advantage of the changes. Often they are the last to see the inevitability of what is happening. So most of them resist such change, and it usually takes an outsider to see the real potential and act upon it. However this generalization is a story for another time.

One of the first people to provide instructions on how to get professional looking results with less time and effort was Robin Williams - the author and teacher not the commedian.

At this time a Maintosh computer could be purchased for about $2,000 to $3,000; the Laserwriter debuted at under $5,000, a real steal compared to other high quality printers at the time which could run as high as $100,000; and Pagemaker from Aldus Corporation weighed in at just under $1,000. For under $10,000 you were set up in the typesetting/publishing business. Just a year before a package of hardware and software to do the same thing had cost over $100,000. What an opportunity!

Of course, you could only actually do the first six steps of a traditional twenty-four step publishing process, but it was the most revolutionary advance since the introduction of the printing press by Johannes Gutenberg and others in the 1400's.

 

General
    Welcome

Desktop Publishing
    Start of Desktop Publishing

iPad
    iPad Opinion
    iPad Update

Organizational Behaviour
    The Short and Glorious History
    Management Essentials
    Motivation - A New Look
    Problem-Solving - Getting Things Done

Programming
    Radio Buttons & Check Boxes
    Variables

Theory of Constraints
    Necessary and Sufficient